Create an API Key Using Code

To use an SDK to create an API key, you first need to obtain the ID of the role to associate with the API key. You also need to use an existing API key to authenticate the call. If no API keys have been created, you can use a username and password to create the first API key.

Obtain a role ID

Obtain a role ID to assign it a role to an API key. When you do not know the ID of a role, you can search for the role and then obtain the role ID.

For example, a program that generates a report on computer security statuses requires read access to all computers. The Auditor role that Deep Security Manager provides by default provides read-only access to computers and policies, and is appropriate for this task.

If you want to create a role, see Control Access Using Roles.

Use the following general steps to search for a role and obtain the ID. For more information about searching, see Search for Resources.

  1. Create a SearchCriteria object that defines the search criteria.
  2. Add the SearchCriteria to a SearchFilter.
  3. Create an AdministratorRolesApi object and use it to perform the search.
  4. Obtain the ID from the returned Role object.

The following example searches for a role by name.

Python

View source

# Store the role ID - default is None
role_id = None
# Search criteria
name_criteria = api.SearchCriteria()
name_criteria.field_name = "name"
name_criteria.string_value = role_name
name_criteria.string_test = "equal"
# Search filter
role_filter = api.SearchFilter()
role_filter.search_criteria = [name_criteria]
# Perform the search and obtain the ID of the returned role
try:
    # Perform the search
    admin_roles_api = api.AdministratorRolesApi(api.ApiClient(configuration))
    roles = admin_roles_api.search_administrator_roles(api_version, search_filter=role_filter)
    if len(roles.roles) > 0:
        role_id = roles.roles[0].id
        return "The role ID for the " + str(role_name) + " role is " + str(role_id) + "."
except api_exception as e:
    return "Exception: " + str(e)
JavaScript

View source

let newRoleID;-- default is undefined= new api.SearchCriteria();
nameCriteria.fieldName = "name";
nameCriteria.stringValue = roleName;
nameCriteria.stringTest = api.SearchCriteria.StringTestEnum.equal;= new api.SearchFilter();
roleFilter.searchCriteria = [nameCriteria];= {
  searchFilter: roleFilter,
  overrides: false
};= new api.AdministratorRolesApi();
adminRolesApi
  .searchAdministratorRoles(apiVersion, searchOptions)
  .then(returnedRoles => {(returnedRoles.roles.length > 0) {
      newRoleID = returnedRoles.roles[0].ID;
    }
    resolve(newRoleID);
  })
  .catch(error => {
    reject(error);
  });
Java

View source

// Search criteria
SearchCriteria nameCriteria = new SearchCriteria();
nameCriteria.setFieldName("name");
nameCriteria.setStringValue(roleName);
nameCriteria.setStringTest(SearchCriteria.StringTestEnum.EQUAL);= new SearchFilter();
roleFilter.addSearchCriteriaItem(nameCriteria);= new AdministratorRolesApi();
AdministratorRoles roles = adminRolesApi.searchAdministratorRoles(roleFilter, apiVersion);
Integer roleId = null;
if (!roles.getRoles().isEmpty()) {
	roleId = roles.getRoles().get(0).getID();
}

Also see the Search Administrator Roles operation in the API Reference.

Create an API key using an SDK

To use an SDK create an API key, create an ApiKey object and set the name and the ID of the role to associate with the API key. You can also specify the following optional properties:

  • A description
  • The time zone
  • The locale
  • The expiry date

Use an APIKeysApi object to create the API key on Deep Security Manager. The ApiKey object that is returned contains the secret key.

To use the API to create an API key, use the Create an API Key operation of the /api/apikeys endpoint.

The following example creates an API key for auditing purposes. The key expires 2 weeks after creation.

Python

View source

# Set key properties
time_to_expiry_in_ms = 14 * 24 * 60 * 60 * 1000
current_time_in_ms = int(round(time.time() * 1000))
key = api.ApiKey()
key.key_name = key_name
key.description = "Read-only access"
key.role_id = "2"
key.locale = "en-US"
key.time_zone = "Asia/Tokyo"
key.expiry_date = current_time_in_ms + time_to_expiry_in_ms # expires in 2 weeks
try:
    # Create the key on Deep Security Manager
    api_keys_api = api.APIKeysApi(api.ApiClient(configuration))
    return api_keys_api.create_api_key(key, api_version)
except api_exception as e:
    return "Exception: " + str(e)
JavaScript

View source

// Key properties
const key = new api.ApiKey();
key.keyName = keyName;
key.description = "Read-only access";
key.roleID = "2";
key.locale = api.ApiKey.LocaleEnum["en-US"];
key.timeZone = "Asia/Tokyo";
key.expiryDate = Date.now() + 1000 * 60 * 60 * 24 * 14;= new api.APIKeysApi();
apiKeysApi
  .createApiKey(key, apiVersion)
  .then(newKey => {resolve(newKey.ID);
  })
  .catch(error => {
    reject(error);
  });
Java

View source

// Create a key object
ApiKey key = new ApiKey();
key.setKeyName(keyName);
key.setDescription("Read-only access");
key.setRoleID(auditRoleID);
key.setLocale(ApiKey.LocaleEnum.EN_US);
key.setTimeZone("Asia/Tokyo");2 weeks from now
key.setExpiryDate(new Long(new Date().getTime() + TimeUnit.DAYS.toMillis(14)));= new ApiKeysApi();
For information about authenticating API calls, see Authenticate with Deep Security Manager.

Create an API key using a username and password

To automate a task when no API key is created yet, you can use the API and a username and password to create the first API key:

  1. Use the /api/sessions resource to obtain a valid session cookie and request ID.
  2. Use the session cookie and request ID in a request to the /api/apikeys resource to create the API key.

Once created, use the API key to make subsequent calls to Deep Security Manager.

Use an HTTP client such as Postman, Paw, or cURL to send a POST request to the /api/sessions resource. The response includes a cookie that contains the session ID, and the response body contains the request ID.

The /api/sessions resource is not available in an SDK at this time.

Use the following information to create the request:

  • Request type: POST
  • URL: https://<Deep Security Manager Hostname>:<port>/api/sessions, for example https://localhost:4119/api/sessions
  • First header:
    • Name: api-version
    • Value: v1
  • Second header:
    • Name: Content-type
    • Value: application/json
  • Body (include the tenantName and mfaCode as well if necessary):
    {
      "userName": "myUserName",
      "password": "myPassword"
    }

Here is an example cURL command. The response cookies are saved in the cookie.txt file. If your Deep Security Manager instance uses an unsigned certificate, add the --insecure option.

curl -i -X POST \
  https://localhost:4119/api/sessions \
  -H 'Cache-Control: no-cache' \
  -H 'Content-Type: application/json' \
  -H 'api-version: v1' \
  -c cookie.txt \
  -d '{
"userName": "myUserName",
"password": "myPassword"
}'

The Set-Cookie response header includes the session ID in the sID cookie. The response body includes the response ID as the value of RID. The response resembles the following example:

X-Frame-Options: SAMEORIGIN
X-XSS-Protection: 1;mode=block
Cache-Control: no-cache,no-store
Pragma: no-cache
Set-Cookie: sID=D5EE2AC155601C895B33B701080D40A6; Path=/; Secure; HttpOnly
Content-Type: application/json
Content-Length: 141
Date: Wed, 24 Oct 2018 15:29:53 GMT
{
    "administratorID": 1,
    "created": 1540309893123,
    "lastActivity": 1540309893123,
    "accessType": "webService",
    "RID": "77DFF81036170DBF92CB71E4559512B9"
}

Use an HTTP client such as Postman, Paw, or cURL to send a POST request to the /api/apikeys resource. Use the session cookie and the response ID that you obtained from the /api/sessions resource to authenticate the call.

The SDKs do not support the use of session IDs and resource IDs for authentication at this time.

Use the following information to create the request:

  • Request type: POST
  • URL: https://<Deep Security Manager Hostname>:<port>/api/apikeys, for example https://localhost:4119/api/sessions
  • First header:
    • Name: api-version
    • Value: v1
  • Second header:
    • Name: Content-type
    • Value: application/json
  • Third header:
    • Name: rID
    • Value: The request ID that you obtained from the sessions resource, for example 77DFF81036170DBF92CB71E4559512B9
  • Cookie: Include the sID cookie from the response that you received from the /api/sessions resource.
  • Body:
    {
      "keyName": "First Key",
      "description": "Created using a request ID",
      "roleID: 1
    }

    For information about obtaining the role ID, see Obtain a role ID.

Here is an example cURL command. The session cookie is included via the cookie.txt file. If your Deep Security Manager instance uses an unsigned certificate, add the --insecure option.

curl -X POST \
  https://192.168.60.128:4119/api/apikeys \
  -H 'Content-Type: application/json' \
  -H 'Postman-Token: 6f81da09-e5e2-421b-a38a-d5679f50608d' \
  -H 'api-version: v1' \
  -H 'rID: 77DFF81036170DBF92CB71E4559512B9' \
  -b cookie.txt \
  -d '{
  "keyName": "First Key",
  "description": "Created using a request ID",
  "roleID": 1
}'

The response body includes the secret key as the value of secretKey, similar to the following example:

{
    "keyName": "First Key",
    "description": "Created using a request ID",
    "locale": "en-US",
    "roleID": 1,
    "timeZone": "America/New_York",
    "active": true,
    "created": 1540310105209,
    "unsuccessfulSignInAttempts": 0,
    "secretKey": "8:4rFctPvno+dxntueMcso4F61SUZMFVt3I6SczG7ysOA=",
    "serviceAccount": false,
    "ID": 8
}

Save the secretKey so that you can later use it in the secret-api-key header of your API calls.